Poster for the movie "Cameraperson"

Cameraperson (2016)

NR 103 min - Documentary - 9 September 2016
Your rating:
Not rated yet!

As a visually radical memoir, CAMERAPERSON draws on the remarkable footage that filmmaker Kirsten Johnson has shot and reframes it in ways that illuminate moments and situations that have personally affected her. What emerges is an elegant meditation on the relationship between truth and the camera frame, as Johnson transforms scenes that have been presented on Festival screens as one kind of truth into another kind of story—one about personal journey, craft, and direct human connection.

Director:  Kirsten Johnson
Writers:  Lisa Freedman, Doris Baizley

Photos

No images were imported for this movie.

Storyline

As a visually radical memoir, CAMERAPERSON draws on the remarkable footage that filmmaker Kirsten Johnson has shot and reframes it in ways that illuminate moments and situations that have personally affected her. What emerges is an elegant meditation on the relationship between truth and the camera frame, as Johnson transforms scenes that have been presented on Festival screens as one kind of truth into another kind of story—one about personal journey, craft, and direct human connection.



Genres: Documentary

Details

Official Website: 
Language:  Arabic, Bosanski, English, Hausa, Farsi
Release Date:  9 September 2016

Box Office

Company Credits

Production Companies:  Fork Films, Big Mouth Productions

Technical Specs

Runtime:  1 h 43 min

Trailer Watch

How To Watch

You can rent on Amazon, Google Play, Youtube, Vudu & Apple itunes.
Or You can directly BUY on Amazon, Google Play, Youtube, Vudu & Apple itunes.

Synopsis

As a visually radical memoir, CAMERAPERSON draws on the remarkable footage that filmmaker Kirsten Johnson has shot and reframes it in ways that illuminate moments and situations that have personally affected her. What emerges is an elegant meditation on the relationship between truth and the camera frame, as Johnson transforms scenes that have been presented on Festival screens as one kind of truth into another kind of story—one about personal journey, craft, and direct human connection.